After series of works surrounding the theme of Silence and Beauty, Makoto Fujimura embarks on a new set of works surrounding the theme of Joy.  “Song of Songs” refers to part of the Wisdom Literature of the Hebrew Sacred Text, attributed to King Solomon. Known to be one of the most beautiful biblical text to describe Greek words agape (self-giving) love and eros (sexual love, or the Japanese concept of Suki) love as God’s gratuitous, extravagant love, Fujimura explores the theme of Joy that arises out of darkness, light that can shine out of the fissures of our brokenness.

The Japanese concept of “Suki”, the third element developed by Japan’s tea culture (“Wabi, Sabi, Suki”), refers to the concept of communicating the extravagance of beauty and unconventional means to express affection (“Suki” literally means to “Like”). Suki is often defined as “subtle elegance” leading to Fujimura’s continued exploration in Songs series – of art as a mean to explore the depth of human experiences.

Joy is the unbridled theme for this series of works, using the unique method of cascading gilded gold on Japanese vermilion surface (modified with space-age iridescent reds to make the vermilion permanent). The larger Song of Songs “mother” panel literally gives “birth” to the other panels through the spreading of cascading gold like nard, creating an ecosystem or a family of paintings. Fujimura honors his mentor Matazo Kayama in using the extravagant materials, while alluding to the works of Mark Rothko. The process of creating this series had been documented by photographer and Fujimura’s long time studio assistant Alyson LeCroy in Fujimura’s studio in Princeton.

After series of works surrounding the theme of Silence and Beauty, Makoto Fujimura embarks on a new set of works surrounding the theme of Joy.  “Song of Songs” refers to part of the Wisdom Literature of the Hebrew Sacred Text, attributed to King Solomon. Known to be one of the most beautiful biblical text to describe Greek words agape (self-giving) love and eros (sexual love, or the Japanese concept of Suki) love as God’s gratuitous, extravagant love, Fujimura explores the theme of Joy that arises out of darkness, light that can shine out of the fissures of our brokenness.

The Japanese concept of “Suki”, the third element developed by Japan’s tea culture (“Wabi, Sabi, Suki”), refers to the concept of communicating the extravagance of beauty and unconventional means to express affection (“Suki” literally means to “Like”). Suki is often defined as “subtle elegance” leading to Fujimura’s continued exploration in Songs series – of art as a mean to explore the depth of human experiences.

Joy is the unbridled theme for this series of works, using the unique method of cascading gilded gold on Japanese vermilion surface (modified with space-age iridescent reds to make the vermilion permanent). The larger Song of Songs “mother” panel literally gives “birth” to the other panels through the spreading of cascading gold like nard, creating an ecosystem or a family of paintings. Fujimura honors his mentor Matazo Kayama in using the extravagant materials, while alluding to the works of Mark Rothko. The process of creating this series had been documented by photographer and Fujimura’s long time studio assistant Alyson LeCroy in Fujimura’s studio in Princeton.